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Orange County Urology Associates (OCUA) is vigilantly monitoring and responding to new information about the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. Our top priority is the health and safety of our patients and staff, our community and the public at large. OCUA is following the guidelines provided to us by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) to protect you and your family. Our offices are open and our doctors and staff are here to provide you with care.

We have boosted our capacity to provide telemedicine visits. We may be calling you to determine if a telemedicine visit would be best for you.

We ask that if you know you have had close contact with a COVID-19 infected person to not come to the office. Rather, please call to discuss your situation and our staff will help determine the best thing to do for you. If you have a fever, cough or have shortness of breath also call the office rather than come in. We are all in this together.

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Review Health Update

Treatment Options for Prostate Cancer

Did you know that men with prostate cancer now have four treatment options? According to Simeon Margolis, MD, PhD, of Yahoo! Health, there’s “watchful waiting, radical prostatectomy, external beam radiation and implantation of radioactive seeds” to the prostate. Of the four treatment options, which among them is the best?

Watchful waiting or doing nothing but getting exams and blood PSA tests is, according to Dr. Margolis, best for men at least 65 years old and undergoing “early-stage, moderate prostate cancer.” However, this is not a good option for older men with higher-grade cancer.

According to Dr. Margolis, only 5 percent of older men suffering from low-grade cancer died from their illness, while more than 80 percent have survived for at least 10 years or died from non-cancer-related causes.

As for younger men, there may be difficulty deciding which treatment option is best. According to an article published in The Annals of Internal Medicine, the reason behind it is that it is difficult to compare treatments. The effectiveness and complications of each treatment vary among different observational studies, as well. In addition, determining the differences with respect to the cancer spread and the survival rate for prostate cancer may also take many years.

All treatment options, however, may have some complications, the most common of which include impotence and incontinence (or urinary leakage). But the findings about complications also have conflicting conclusions.

One study showed that incontinence was likely to occur after external radiation or radical prostatectomy. On the other hand, another study revealed that incontinence is more frequent after a radical prostatectomy rather than external radiation. Impotence, however, is common in all options post-treatment, particularly after radical prostatectomy.

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